Free SSL: SSL is an industry standard security measure that creates an encrypted link between your visitor’s browser and your website. Installing SSL certificate on your site will add a small green padlock icon on your address bar, which makes your site look trustworthy. Similar to the free domain offer, some web hosting providers also offer free SSL certificate when signing up for their hosting plan.

13. 1&11&1 can be described as an online productivity suite comprised of several useful modules, among which are website creation & hosting, domains, servers, email & office services, web security, and online marketing tools. It is a cost-effective option for those looking to craft and launch instant sites and facilitates online management, regardless of the complexity of your content. You can also build a ready-to-use online store and monetize your web presence, having the peace of mind that a dedicated team is managing and monitoring your performance at all points in time. 1&1 also offers WordPress hosting services and provides users with dedicated email addresses that match their domain names. 
The availability of a website is measured by the percentage of a year in which the website is publicly accessible and reachable via the Internet. This is different from measuring the uptime of a system. Uptime refers to the system itself being online. Uptime does not take into account being able to reach it as in the event of a network outage.[citation needed] A hosting provider's Service Level Agreement (SLA) may include a certain amount of scheduled downtime per year in order to perform maintenance on the systems. This scheduled downtime is often excluded from the SLA timeframe, and needs to be subtracted from the Total Time when availability is calculated. Depending on the wording of an SLA, if the availability of a system drops below that in the signed SLA, a hosting provider often will provide a partial refund for time lost. How downtime is determined changes from provider to provider, therefore reading the SLA is imperative.[11] Not all providers release uptime statistics.[12] Most hosting providers will guarantee at least 99.9% uptime which will allow for 43m of downtime per month, or 8h 45m of downtime per year.
The company packs in the freebies right from the start, giving users a drag-and-drop site builder with hundreds of design templates, along with free domain registration, SSL certificate, and hassle-free site migration. Even better, InMotion has among the best customer service teams in the business, with 24/7 support available via chat, phone, and email.
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If your business depends on the web, you should think of acquiring solid web hosting as investing in real estate on the Internet, namely, purchasing a settlement and maintenance location for one’s blog or retail website. In the role of a silent backdoor engine in charge of all performance matters, web hosting is not only a critical investment but one you simply can’t take for granted.Of course, choosing the right web hosting company is easier said than done. To help you choose the best provider for your needs, we gathered the 20 best web hosting companies, to help you on zero in on the ideal service.
I used godaddy for a few years but grew tired of constant price hikes not to mention how difficult it was to edit my site. My site was deleted when I canceled my subscription and I can’t use my web site name unless I want to fork over almost $200. I don’t need online ordering as I’m a small home bakery, I don’t need one email address let alone 10, I just want an online presence so customers can find me. However, I want to be sure I’m buying something I can work with easily. Any suggestions?
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Until 1991, the Internet was restricted to use only "...for research and education in the sciences and engineering..."[1][2] and was used for email, telnet, FTP and USENET traffic—but only a tiny number of web pages. The World Wide Web protocols had only just been written[3][4] and not until the end of 1993 would there be a graphical web browser for Mac or Windows computers.[5] Even after there was some opening up of internet access, the situation was confused until 1995.[6] 

For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Senior Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web hosting, music, utilities, and video game copy, Jeffrey makes comic books, mentors, practices bass and Jeet Kune Do, and appears on the odd podcasts or convention panel. He also collects vinyl and greatly enjoys a craft brew. You can a find Jeffrey online at jeffreylwilson.net, or send him a tweet at @jeffreylwilson
It shouldn't come as any surprise that, like other web host providers, A2 Hosting's unlimited plans aren't actually unlimited. It expect you to use its service like "similarly situated customers." This is like being on a highway. If everyone is going a few miles above the speed limit, you're probably okay, but if you're barreling down the fast lane past everyone else, you're probably going to be asked to slow down.
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